Part III: The Bishops Garden’s Flowers.

 
The Bishop's Garden. Photo courtesy The All Hallows Guild.

The Bishop's Garden. Photo courtesy The All Hallows Guild.

We’ve seen the over all feel of the Bishop’s garden on Sunday, with it’s boxwoods and European styling and lovely pathways and little surprising places to sit. The main reason people come is for the flowers.   Like many gardens, the Bishop’s Garden has tremendous charm throughout the changing floral season.  In Spring it’s full of fun purples and pinks with floral wonders on tall stems waiting for the bee.

These Purple beauties are a delight! © Britt Conley

These Purple beauties are a delight! © Britt Conley

Tulips are a Spring favorite and here is no different.  Local photographer Karon Flage caught these at their peak!  Her floral and garden photography is great!  She also shoots just about everything!  You can see her work at http://www.flickr.com/photos/karonf/

Tulips in the Bishop's Garden © Britt Conley

Tulips in the Bishop's Garden © Karon Flage

The Fall is actually one of my favorite times to shoot when the roses are still out but the fauna has changed colors.  It makes for lovely color combinations.

Roses © Britt Conley

Roses © Britt Conley

The Bishop's Garden's Roses © Britt Conley

The Bishop's Garden's Roses © Britt Conley

As with many gardens the Bishop’s Garden is at its greatest splendor in the Spring.

The Upper Perennial Border.  Photo courtesy The All Hallows Guild.

The Upper Perennial Border. Photo courtesy The All Hallows Guild.

Just the other week the garden was bursting upward with fall color!

This should be a wild Summer garden but it's Fall! © Britt Conley

This should be a wild Summer garden but it's Fall! © Britt Conley

There is so much more to this garden than it’s flowers, creative pathways and hidden corners.  There is rich European history here if you just know where to look!

The Font in the center of the Bishop's Garden © Britt Conley

The Font in the center of the Bishop's Garden © Britt Conley

Nancy Symington, describes in her work, PLAQUES, ARTIFACTS, STATUES AND FOUNTAINS IN THE BISHOP’S GARDEN AND ELSEWHERE ON THE CATHEDRAL CLOSE, that the font in the center of the garden, “is attributed to the time of Charlemagne and is reported to have come from the Abbey of St. Julie in the Aisne. The top is marble and the pedestal is of Caen limestone. It was an acquisition from the collection of George Grey Barnard.”

The Sun-dial © Britt Conley

The Sun-dial © Britt Conley

The Sundial, she continues, is “18th century English Bronze” which, rests, “on a 13th century Gothic capital of Caen limestone from a ruined monastery near Rheims Cathedral. ”  Symington also points us toward the upper perennial border where there is a wonderful Celtic cross titled The Wayside Cross, which she describes for us as, ” a round-headed or wheel cross,… made of sandstone, (which dates) from early Christian pilgrimages.”

The Wayside Cross.  Photo courtesy the National Cathedral.

The Wayside Cross. Photo courtesy the National Cathedral.

Overall the Bishop’s garden is a Washington destination garden.  If you haven’t been there, take yourself.  When you do come to visit look, for the little cottage shop and to it’s left on the “South Road” is the Norman style arch and entrance to this tranquil secret garden.

The entrance to the Bishop's Garden © Britt Conley

The entrance to the Bishop's Garden © Britt Conley

After visiting the garden, hit the Garden Shop.  It too is a destination!  Most importantly when you visit, spend as much time as you can in the Cathedral.  It is one the great landmarks of Washington DC and the Nation.  We will be taking a visit through the Cathedral this week and it’s worth every minute!

Come back tomorrow for more of our National Cathedral.

‘Til Tomorrow…

Britt : )

Related posts:

  1. Part I: The Bishop’s Garden at the National Cathedral
  2. Part VI: Some of the Flowers and Garden areas at Brookside Gardens.
  3. Part II: Flowers and Light? The National Cathedral embraced in light!
  4. The Huntington’s Japanese Garden in San Marino, California.
  5. Part III: The Rose Garden at Brookside Gardens.

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