At Missouri Botanic Garden, Spring is worth the wait!

 
Ottoman Garden, Photo by Mary Ann Olson

Ottoman Garden, Photo by Mary Ann Olson courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

It may be the middle of a leafless, cold, grey Winter but Spring is just around the corner so let’s take a look ahead to what the warmer weather will bring.  Spring is just the start of three amazing blooming seasons at  Misouri Botanic Garden.

One of the many things the garden is known for is their extensive bulb collections.  “There are over 1,000 different types of bulbous plants that are cycled through here in the spring, summer and fall,” says Jason Delaney, senior outdoor horticulturalist in charge of the Heckman and Samuels Bulb Gardens.

 Heckman Bulb Garden, Photo by Heather Marie Osborn, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Heckman Bulb Garden, Photo by Heather Marie Osborn, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

The Missouri Botanic Garden proudly displays over 1,250 varieties of daylily, “representing many different award collections, wild species, historic varieties, and Missouri-hybridized cultivars bloom throughout June and July, with many reblooming through late fall.”

Jenkins Daylily Garden. Photo by Laila Wessel, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Jenkins Daylily Garden. Photo by Laila Wessel, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Each year the garden grows its collection by adding, “between 50,000 and 85,000 bulbs to its existing displays. In 2009, to honor the institution’s 150th anniversary, visitors… witness a total of 150,000 new bulbs throughout the grounds, timed to bloom throughout the year. Innumerable bulbs exist on the Garden’s 79-acre campus.”

Jenkins Daylily Garden, Photo by Heather Marie Osborn, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Jenkins Daylily Garden, Photo by Heather Marie Osborn, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

If there are any photographic friends of the Bee in the midwest, this looks to be a great destination garden.  For flower photographers, timing is everything and here they let gladly let visitors know precisly when the best viewing days are.   The gardens tells us, “hundreds of cultivars of bearded iris are in peak bloom around Mother’s Day, representing nearly every color of the rainbow. Tall, intermediate, border and dwarf bearded irises, as well as Japanese, Spuria, Louisiana, Siberian, and many rare species comprise this nationally recognized collection. Many of the collection’s bearded irises rebloom, repeating the flowering season from late August through late November.”

Goodman Iris Garden, Photo by Heather Marie Osborn, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Goodman Iris Garden, Photo by Heather Marie Osborn, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

But bulbs are only a taste of what awaits the garen visitor here.  At Missouri Botanc Garden you can also see more than 2600 rose bushes and 265 differnt varieties or roses from early Summer through Fall.  There are two rose displays, The Gladney Rose Garden and The Lehmann Rose Garden.  The Gladney Rose Garden has been growing since 1917.  According to the garden, “It has evolved over the years to its present giant wagon-wheel shape. About 1,250 roses representing 105 varieties of mainly hybrid tea, grandiflora and floribunda roses displayed. More shrub roses are being incorporated as their popularity grows.”  The Anne and John Lehmann Rose Garden, (seen below), is described as bushy mix of old floribunda, shrub roses and others. It is less formal than the Gladney Rose Garden, and contains about 1,350 roses representing 160 different varieties.”

Lehmann Rose Garden.  Photo by Brian Mueller, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Lehmann Rose Garden. Photo by Brian Mueller, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Additionally there are plenty of other gardens.  Below are just a couple of what you can find within this vast garden acerage. The Victorian District, the garden explains, there are “bedding plants of many types, colors and sizes throughout the year as the displays change with the seasons. These colorful planting schemes are typically drawn and installed three times a year, using over 7,000 plants in the summer.”

Victorian District.  Photo by Josh Monken, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Victorian District. Photo by Josh Monken, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Lastly, another great place for flowers is The Kemper Center for Home Gardening which is part of the Missouri Botanic Garden.  The garden states that it is the, “largest non-profit gardening information center of its kind in the nation. It provides recreation, education and resources for Midwestern home gardeners. Programs are developed jointly through partnership with University of Missouri Extension.”

Kemper Center for Home Gardening.  Photo by Laila Wessel, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Kemper Center for Home Gardening. Photo by Laila Wessel, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

With 200 Master Gardeners and other volunteers, The Kemper’s goal is, “to teach gardening skills through gardening programs and displays; to encourage more people to improve their lives and homes through the pleasures and rewards of home gardening; to better serve visitors by providing accurate and accessible information on indoor and outdoor plants for the home.” states the garden.

You can find more information about these few gardens and all the others at http://www.mobot.org

Til tomorrow…

Britt : )

Related posts:

  1. Here at Missouri Botanical Garden beauty doesn’t fall away just because the snow has fallen
  2. Bicentennial Rose Garden at Norfolk Botanical Garden
  3. The Rise of the Spring Roses at Dumbarton Oaks
  4. 2010 AHS Spring Garden Market at River Farm!
  5. Celebrate a Symphony of Spring at this weekend’s Maryland Home & Garden Show!

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4 Comments

 
  1. Lee Larrick
    2010-01-23
    18:55:29

    Love the Missouri Botanical Gardens! Can't wait for Spring!

     
  2. Britt
    2010-01-23
    19:04:19

    Me too. I would love to photograph tulips!

     
  3. Lee Larrick
    2010-01-24
    00:20:50

    Let me know if you get out here, I'll road trip!

     
  4. Mushtaq
    2010-02-07
    12:02:56

    How the Lehmann Rose Garden, seems attractive , great picture.
    greenhouse

     
 

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