Here at Missouri Botanical Garden beauty doesn’t fall away just because the snow has fallen

 

Just because we have six more weeks of winter doesn’t mean we have to wait to head out to our favorite gardens.  Here at Missouri Botanical Garden beauty doesn’t fall away just because the snow has fallen.

Garden Sheep.  Photo by Erin Whitson, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Garden Sheep. Photo by Erin Whitson, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

There lovely sheep are out and about every day no matter the weather.  They were created by artist Francios-Xavier Lalanne, and are made of stone and bronze with a cast epoxy.  I happen to love sculpture within the garden setting.

Japanese Garden.  Photo by Lee Shannon Rhoades, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Japanese Garden. Photo by Lee Shannon Rhoades, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

One of the great things I’ve learned as a garden photographer is that the worst travel days often make the best and most beautiful days to visit.  I often see Japanese Gardens in the Spring and Summer but the winter brings out still beauty that must be amazing to walk through.  The Selwa-en Japanese Garden, seen above and below, was designed by Professor Koichi Kawana and provides a four-acre lake, streams and islands to wander.

The Japanese Garden. Photo by Erin Whitson, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden.

The Japanese Garden. Photo by Erin Whitson, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden.

The Lichtenstein Victorian Garden is actually a collection of gardens and Victorian style buildings.  Below, the Kaeser Memorial Maze twists visitors toward the central vine covered gazebo.

The Victorian District.  Photo by Erin Whitson, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

The Victorian District. Photo by Erin Whitson, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

The Grigg Nanjling Friendship Garden is a Chinese themed garden that offers stunning walls, pavillions and bridges.  The Missouri Botanical Garden explains that the garden was, “designed in the traditional colors of black, white, gray, and vermillion.”

The Chinese Garden Wall. Photo by Kat Douglas, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

The Chinese Garden Wall. Photo by Kat Douglas, courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

There are 79 acres to explore here this Winter with nearly 5, 200 trees to photograph!   If it gets too cold there is always the Climatron, (below).

The Climatron.  Photo by Brian Mueller, Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

The Climatron. Photo by Brian Mueller, Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

The Missouri Botanical Garden touts that the Climatron, “houses some 1,400 species of plants in a natural, tropical setting. Visitors enjoy viewing bananas, cacao, and coffee trees, plus a collection of orchids and epiphytes. The rare double coconut, possessing the largest seed in the plant kingdom, is on display. A large collection of cycads, primitive gymnosperms with massive, divided leaves, are also on display. Several pools and waterfalls give a sense of lushness, as if visitors were within a true tropical rainforest.”  For more information visit : http://www.mobot.org

There are thousands of gardens across the country and most are open even in the Winter.  For the next six weeks offers the opportunity to visit a lovely garden setting near you.  Take a camera and let me know what you find!  I may just have to have a Winter in the Gardens featuring my Bee Friends.

Well, I am getting back to putting together the rest of my 300 total mats for my “Daily Flower” prints that I’ll be selling this weekend at the Mid-Atlantic Home and Flower Show at the Virginia Beach Convention Center.  I’ll be in booth #304.  Hope to see you!

‘Til Tomorrow…

Britt : )

Related posts:

  1. At Missouri Botanic Garden, Spring is worth the wait!
  2. The Huntington’s Japanese Garden in San Marino, California.
  3. Part IV: The Asian Valley at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
  4. Winter at Norfolk Botanical Garden
  5. The Kaufman Hydrangea Garden at Norfolk Botanical Garden

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1 Comments

 
  1. jodi (bloomingwriter)
    2010-02-06
    14:17:41

    Oh, Britt, I am so envious. I have been to Powell Gardens outside Kansas City, but not to MoBot, which I dream about visiting. I use their Kemper Centre Plantfinder resource on a regular basis.

     
 

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