At Denver Botanic Gardens it’s all about ambiance

 

Many gardens are just pretty to look at as one strolls through.  At Denver they offer a variety of high-altitude collection of plants types that provide delightful floral filled paths.  The area aren’t just pretty they are the perfect gardens for the plant curious. They explain that the plant collections include:

“Alpine, which consists of plants that grow in habitats such as rock crevices and exposed locations; Amenity, which showcases plants of the Rocky Mountain and Plains region, a semi-arid, steppe climate.; Aquatic, also called hydrophytic plants or hydrophytes, are plants that have adapted to living in or on aquatic environments; Cactus and Succulents, which consist of water-retaining plants adapted to arid climate or soil conditions; Native, which are plants that occur naturally (pre-European settlement) within the borders of Colorado, but not necessarily exclusive to Colorado.;Steppe, are plants from regions located away from the ocean and close to mountain barriers with low humidity.; and Tropical, (which), showcases plants found in the lowland tropical rainforests around the world.”

The Water-Smart Garden. Photo courtesty Denver Botanic Gardens

The Water-Smart Garden. Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

The ice plant, (below), found in Anna’s Overlook, is a “fast spreading ground cover. Blooming most of the growing season, the lustrous fuchsia colored flowers are an improvement on Delosperma cooperi. The leaves remain turgid green, often tinged with purple during the winter.” according to Denver Botanic Gardens.

The Ice Plant on Anna's Overlook Photo courtesty Denver Botanic Gardens

The Ice Plant on Anna's Overlook Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

Anna’s Overlook (above) is near by the All-American Selections garden, (below),  which the gardens states, “promotes new garden seed varieties with superior garden performance judged in impartial trials in North America. Founded in 1933, over 700 plants have been introduced through this program.”

All-America Selections Garden.  Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

All-America Selections Garden. Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

The Romantic Garden not only displays wonderfully blue, green and yellow colored columns and a covered gazebo, it is also home to many lush floral collections.  The gardens explains, “The aromatic plants and plum trees of the Fragrance Garden and the lavish floral display of annual, perennials and overflowing containers in the sheltering pavilions of the Schlessman Plaza.”  I for one can’t wait to get here and photograph the area in the morning light.

Romantic Gardens.  Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

Romantic Gardens. Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

Denver doesn’t just display American style gardens.  This Japanse Garden filled with Ponderosa pine is lovely.  It also holds an “authentic teahouse was shipped across the Pacific from Japan and reassembled by skilled Japanese artisans.” Denver boasts.

The Japanese Garden.  Photo courtety Denver Botanic Gardens

The Japanese Garden. Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

June’s Plant Asia is a fantastic garden with over, “8,000 exotic and fragrant plants from various Asian countries in a one-acre display.” according to Denver Botanic Gardens.  They explain the area, “features eastern Asian plants such as peonies, bamboos, wild herbs, Japanese umbrella pines (Sciadopitys verticillata), wild plants collected in Pakistan, voodoo lilies (Typhonium venosum) and experimental cultivars of plants. A lush woodland area displays Himalayan and lacebark pines (Pinus wallichiana, Pinus bungeana) and over a dozen kinds of Asian maple.”

Plant Asia.  Photo courtety Denver Botanic Gardens

Plant Asia. Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

There is also the Rock Alpine Garden is full of, “2,300 species of plants” including the Spreading Buckwheat which Denver Botanic Gardens points out, “flourishes from Kansas to Wyoming.”  I really love this space.  Being an East Coast city girl, I don’t often see flowers living amid rock formations.

Rock Alpine Garden. Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens.

Rock Alpine Garden. Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens.

The main Conservatory is home to the tropical plant collection from around the world which features, “various food plants add special interest, including bananas (Musa spp.), chocolate (Theobroma cacao) and coffee (Coffea arabica).” Denver adds.

The conservatory and gardens.  Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

The conservatory and gardens. Photo courtesy Denver Botanic Gardens

There is so much to see and do here, even in the Winter.  Currently the gardens is displaying Golden Shrimp Plant, also known as the Lolypop plant.  It’s pretty cool! They also point out that the Magnolia Buds are getting started to bloom.  Of course there is the tropical gardens inside the conservatory which is a warm haven for a cold day.

The Denver Botanic Gardens entrance.  Photo courtesy of the Denver Botanic Gardens.

The Denver Botanic Gardens entrance. Photo courtesy of the Denver Botanic Gardens.

This garden destination is a great place for those gardeners who want to see just what can grow in high-altitude and semi-arid conditions.  As always, there is so much more here than I could fit in this feature.  I am looking forward to the chance to visit..  For more information visit http://www.botanicgardens.org

As for me,  I am in booth #304 at the Mid-Atlantic Home and Flower Show within the Virginia Beach Convention Center.  I’ll be working hard all day for the next three days to sell select black and white Photo Garden Bee, “Daily Flowers.”  The proceeds help keep this bee traveling from garden to garden and flower to flower!  Like today’s, Friday’s post will late in the day.  Unfortunately, I won’t have internet at the table.

‘Til Tomorrow…

Britt : )

Related posts:

  1. At Missouri Botanic Garden, Spring is worth the wait!
  2. The Portland Japanese Garden: Where nature and ambiance meet
  3. Art in the Gardens at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
  4. Escape to Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden!
  5. Part V: The Conservatory at Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens.

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4 Comments

 
  1. susan
    2010-02-05
    11:41:00

    Simply lovely!

     
  2. Marla
    2010-04-21
    08:07:31

    Oh my, the gardens are just as lovely as I remember them from my trip of several years ago. As fall ended, the gardens were open for seed gathering. Of course, I did my fair share of gathering.

     
  3. Britt
    2010-04-21
    22:14:42

    I really can't wait to visit Denver myself! I bet it is wonderful in person!

     
  4. JUDAH-PEGS CHRISIAN
    2014-04-18
    08:59:27

    Another of the Great Wonders of our World!

    PEGS

     
 

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