Winter Camellias at Norfolk Botanical Garden

 

As the sign says, “Welcome to the Hofheimer Camellia Garden.”   This area of Norfolk Botanical Garden is lovely.  The camellias carpet the woods with nearly 700 separate plants with names like, Spring Mist, Ashton’s Ballet, Okan, Yoimach, Donnan’s Dream, Big Apple, Magnoliaeflora, Wine by the Gate, and Cinnamon Scentsation to name but a few.

You can see them in perfect bloom and get species descriptions at http://www.norfolkbotanicalgarden.org/gardens-horticulture/collections/camellia

Francis Eugene Phillips Camellia © Britt Conley

Francis Eugene Phillips Camellia © Britt Conley

Now I came on one of the coldest day’s of the year.  The blooms were shrunken but beautiful.  There were great blossoms as well.  Both were equally lovely to photograph.  Personally I love the complexity of blooms that have both perfect and damaged petals.  There is a lovely bitter sweet quality about them that displays what once was and what is to become.  These Camellias below are already frost worn and just lovely!

Tenju Camellias © Britt Conley

Tenju Camellias © Britt Conley

A fantastic woodland garden area, the camellias here are varied.  This Red Hot Camellia, however, was in full bloom despite the weather.  A perfect bloom for Valentines Day.

Red Hot Camellia © Britt Conley

Red Hot Camellia © Britt Conley

Who says that Roses have to have all the fun.

According to Norfolk Botanical Garden, there are “1700 camellia plants in the collection… (With), more than 1100 different types of camellias in the Garden – one of the largest collections of Camellias in the Southeastern U.S. Visitors will find camellias throughout the Garden, but the majority of the collection can be found in two places – Mirror Lake and the Hofheimer Camellia Garden.”

Camellia Sinensis © Britt Conley

Camellia Sinensis © Britt Conley

The sun was caught behind the clouds for most of the visit but that didn’t stop it from peeking out a couple of times, if only for a brief moment to show the lovely colors of the petalsthat had fallen on the ground.

Fragrant Pink Camellias © Britt Conley

Fragrant Pink Camellias © Britt Conley

I would have loved to see all 700 bushes in bloom at the same time but I will try to be down here again next year at just the right time.  The ones that were bursting in color made up for those that were either falling away or just beginning, like this one below!

Cream Puff Camellia © Britt Conley

Cream Puff Camellia © Britt Conley

The frost made this Silver Wave Camellia a delicate toasted brown.  The outer leaves have protected the inside blossom.  A fantastic Winter bloom.

Silver Waves Camellia © Britt Conley

Silver Waves Camellia © Britt Conley

No matter the weather there is always something great to see at Norfolk Botanical Garden.  The Camellias are worth the visit.  I plan to give them a more thorough visit in the future.

Pink Dahlia Camellias © Britt Conley

Pink Dahlia Camellias © Britt Conley

Looks like there will be plenty of opportunities this Winter.  I bet they are fantastic to photograph in full snow! If you get a chance to head out there.. feel free to send The Bee some pics… I would love to show a selection of what Bee Friends are up to.

Camelia © Britt Conley

Camellia © Britt Conley

Well, I have one more feature on my trip to Norfolk Botanical Garden but that will come later. Tomorrow I am happily featuring one of my fellow exhibitors at this past weekends Mid-Atlantic Home and Flower Show.  As for me, I’m gearing up for this massive Snow blizzard heading our way.  I hope everyone stays safe and warm.

‘Til Tomorrow…

Britt : )

Related posts:

  1. Winter at Norfolk Botanical Garden
  2. Bicentennial Rose Garden at Norfolk Botanical Garden
  3. The Kaufman Hydrangea Garden at Norfolk Botanical Garden
  4. The Children’s Garden at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens
  5. Here at Missouri Botanical Garden beauty doesn’t fall away just because the snow has fallen

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2 Comments

 
  1. Nell Jean
    2010-02-10
    19:41:42

    It gives me sadness to see photos of cold-bitten camellias. I never save a pic of one that isn't picture worthy, no browning. The ugly ones will fall off in a few days and buds that were tight during the extreme cold will open with minimal damage. We have had more prolonged cold this winter than usual and my camellias are not up to their best.

    I hope you'll have an opportunity to return when the weather is better. Some cultivars will not bloom until after the worst of the winter cold.

     
  2. Britt
    2010-02-11
    00:31:38

    I hear you Jean. I spent so much time photographing perfect blooms I actually love the beauty in those that are fading now. It seems nature is pretty all the time now. I am definately coming back down to the gardens and soon. I was really impressed.

     
 

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