The Huntington’s Japanese Garden in San Marino, California.

 
The Japanese Garden in the Fall. Photo courtesy The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

The Japanese Garden in the Fall. Photo courtesy The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Today at 3:30 and 7:30pm there is the Founder’s Day LectureThe Restoration of an Icon: The Japanese Garden at 100: The Huntington Describes the lecture on the upcoming 2012 centennial as, “a look forward into the future with James Folsom, the Marge and Sherm Telleen/Marion and Earle Jorgensen Director of the Botanical Gardens.” There is limited seating and reservations required. They suggest reserving your free tickets online, for the two times that are available: 3:30 p.m. or 7:30 p.m. or calling 1-800-838-3006.

Wisteria frames the Japanese Garden in the Spring. Photo courtesy The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Wisteria frames the Japanese Garden in the Spring. Photo courtesy The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Aside from offering a lovely photogenic vista, the Huntington Boasts that it’s Japanese Garden, “one of America’s oldest, most elaborate, and gracefully matured Japanese gardens.”   It contains,  ”a five-room house, pagodas and lanterns, and many mature plants were moved to the site from a commercial tea garden in Pasadena in 1912. A walled courtyard containing a rock and sand garden and a bonsai exhibition area was added in 1968. The garden boasts several beautiful forms of Japanese red pine, handsome spreading junipers, large cycads, arbors of wisteria, and thirty-foot-high sweet olives”  Being on the East coast, I have yet to head out here but it’s on my must see list for my first garden tour of the West.

Japanese Apricots in the Spring. Photo courtesy The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Japanese Apricots in the Spring. Photo courtesy The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

With Spring around the corner it’s clearly a great garden for photographs, strolling and relaxing.  In addition to the flowering Japanese Apricots seen above, you can also find, “Formosan cherry, flowering peaches and single- and double-flowered plums,” in addition to, “weeping willow, clusters of cycads, … junipers and pines,”  they add.

Lily Pond

Lily Pond. Photo courtesy The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Originally created in 1904 by Wiliam Hertirch, the nearby beautiful and historic Lily Pond garden, contains koi, bullfrogs and turtles and a large selection of lovely flora.  Yet another great place for photography.

For a list of what is in bloom right now visit their February Bloom page.

There is so much more to these garden’s than I’ve passed along.  For more information visit : http://www.huntington.org/

Well, today is short and sweet.  I was under the weather this weekend and didn’t get a chance to photograph any gardens.  That said, I am getting ready to head up to the Philadelphia Flower Show tomorrow!  It’s my first time visiting the show.  I’ll be tweeting and Facebooking all day with what’s in store this year!  I can’t wait to see it all!  Go Blooms!

‘Til Tomorrow…

Britt : )

Related posts:

  1. The Desert Garden at The Huntington
  2. The Portland Japanese Garden: Where nature and ambiance meet
  3. Part VII: The Japanese Style Garden at Brookside Gardens.
  4. Part II: Maymont’s Japanese Garden.
  5. Art Nouveau and Flower Fans Rejoice!

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4 Comments

 
  1. Noelle/azplantlady
    2010-03-01
    14:01:36

    One of my most favorite gardens to visit. Your photos are just beautiful. I hope to be able to visit this summer.

     
  2. Sunny
    2010-03-01
    19:15:18

    Looks like a lovely place. And your photos are delicious :)

     
  3. Heidi
    2010-03-03
    10:15:09

    What a serene and inviting garden. If I even make it to the US I'd love to visit this garden!

     
  4. Britt
    2010-03-03
    11:38:54

    Thanks, It really is a unique was to display and the colors are amazing! I so hope you get a chance to visit!

     
 

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