A Taste of Biltmore’s Gardens by guest blogger Julia Schmalz

 

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

I just returned from a two-day visit to the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C.

Here is just a tease to a couple of the fabulous gardens there.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

The exciting thing about Biltmore is that there are a great variety of gardens for all sorts of interests.

I just returned from a two-day visit to the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C. Here is just a tease to a couple of the fabulous gardens there.

Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted for George W. Vanderbilt in the late1800s, the gardens of Biltmore range from the ultra formal, to subtle natural feel reminiscent of Olmsted’s other great work – Central Park.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

The formal gardens are close to the house and are surrounded by a much grander forest landscaped by Olmsted.  A spouting fish fountain marks the transition from the woodland approach to the formal grounds.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

Biltmore was the last major project Olmsted designed, taking seven years.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

The azaleas were past, but we were lucky to find some woodland treasures, such as lady slippers, on the Spring Garden trail. Olmsted used a significant amount of native plants.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

The mountain laurels were just coming into bloom. There were several varieties that ranged from light pink to scarlet.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

Roses are contained within the walled garden near the conservatory. It’s very formal and easy to imagine the turn of the century elite strolling about.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

An antique Madame Ernest Calvat rose labeled Bourbon 1888 was in full bloom.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

Several Climbing Old Blush roses dated 1789 added color to the stonewalls of the garden.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

Poulsen’s Pearl Floribunda 1949 rose was another addition to the rose collection.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

A Tiffany hybrid tea rose was introduced in 1955.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

Here is a modern Blushing Knockout shrub rose from 2004

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

That’s it for this taste of Biltmore. Not be missed though are the Conservatory, Italian Garden, views from the South Terrace of the mountains and the hike to the Statue of Diana.

Biltmore © Julia Schmalz

There are thousands of acres of trails to explore, including a gentle walk to the bass pond. Many places for the Photo Garden Bee to explore!

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A huge thank you to Julia for wanting to be a part of The Photo Garden Bee and helping out This Bee during my recovery!

Julia Schmalz

Julia Schmalz is a multimedia producer at USA TODAY. In her free time she and her partner enjoy the company of the turtles and toads that help manage their Northern Virginia shady garden.
‘Til Tomorrow…

Britt : )

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1 Comments

 
  1. alex
    2010-05-24
    18:04:01

    Beautiful work, Julia!

     
 

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